The Color of Water

A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother

by James McBride

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Who was Ruth McBride Jordan? Not even her son knew the answer to that question until he embarked on a twelve-year journey that changed himself and his family forever. Born Rachel Deborah Shilsky, she began life as the daughter of an angry, failed orthodox Jewish rabbi in the South. To escape her unhappy childhood, Ruth ran awat to Harlem, married a black man, became Babtist and started an all-black church. Her son James tells of growing up with inner confusions, chaos, and financial hardships; of his own flirtation with drugs and violence; of the love and faith his mother gave her twelve children; and of his belated coming to terms with her Jewish heritage. The result is a powerful portrait of growing up, a meditation on race and identity, and apoignant, beautifully crafted hymn from a son to his mother.


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Publisher: Phoenix Books, Inc.
Edition: Unabridged

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  • File size: 197574 KB
  • Release date: February 6, 2007
  • Duration: 06:51:00

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  • File size: 197574 KB
  • Release date: February 6, 2007
  • Duration: 06:51:00
  • Number of parts: 6


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Who was Ruth McBride Jordan? Not even her son knew the answer to that question until he embarked on a twelve-year journey that changed himself and his family forever. Born Rachel Deborah Shilsky, she began life as the daughter of an angry, failed orthodox Jewish rabbi in the South. To escape her unhappy childhood, Ruth ran awat to Harlem, married a black man, became Babtist and started an all-black church. Her son James tells of growing up with inner confusions, chaos, and financial hardships; of his own flirtation with drugs and violence; of the love and faith his mother gave her twelve children; and of his belated coming to terms with her Jewish heritage. The result is a powerful portrait of growing up, a meditation on race and identity, and apoignant, beautifully crafted hymn from a son to his mother.


Expand title description text